Disparities and Vulnerable Populations

INTERVIEWS

Respecting the Disabled at End of Life

Paul Tobin, president & CEO of the United Spinal Association, discusses end of life concerns of people with disabilities, ranging from access to services and supports to maximize independence to perspectives on assisted suicide.

22-Oct-10, Paul Tobin, President & CEO, United Spinal Association

CULTURAL DIVERSITY ARTICLES

Bioethics Forum

VULNERABLE POPULATION AND DISPARITIES ARTICLES

BIOETHICS CHANNEL

Conflicting View about the Review Process for Ashley X

In 2007, a developmentally disabled 7-year old girl underwent procedures in a Seattle hospital to stop normal growth. The Ashley X case created headlines and raised a host of ethical questions. Those issues are revisited in the January 2010 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics. Here, two bioethicists, one who supported the process of review followed by the ethics committee and the other who did not, discuss why such procedures should or should not require a court order. The bioethicists are Dr. Norman Fost, Professor of Pediatrics and Bioethics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Dr. John Lantos, Director of Children's Mercy Hospital Bioethics Center in Kansas City, and past John B. Francis Chair at the Center. (January 22, 2010, Norman Fost)

 

Cultural Fault Lines in Healthcare

Cultural fault lines exist in healthcare with clashing moral traditions, principles, values and beliefs, according to Michael Brannigan, PhD, the Pfaff Endowed Chair in Ethics and Moral Values at the College of St. Rose in Albany, New York. Dr. Brannigan examines how healthcare institutions have responded to these cultural fault lines. His most recent book is entitle "Cultural Fault Lines in Healthcare: Reflections on Cultural Competency." May 3, 2012

 

Pros and Cons of using Organs Donated by Living or Executed Prisoners

Arthur Caplan, PhD, Director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses an October 2011 article in the American Journal of Bioethics, which considers the pros and cons of using organs donated by living or executed prisoners. (October 11, 2011)

 

Implementations of New HIV Testing

An article in the April 2011 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics addresses ethical concerns over new recommendations for HIV testing, which appear to focus on implementation rather than the recommendations themselves, as discussed here with article co-author Teresa Celada of Wheaton College. (April 15, 2011)

 

 When Public Health Officials Collaborated in Crimes Against Humanity

Susan Bachrach, Curator US Holocaust Memorial Museum, and Jean Zeldin, Executive Director, Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, discuss the long path to genocide, including ideas about eugenics, which created an environment in which physicians and public health officials collaborated in crimes against humanity.

 

Transforming Bioethics: Sensitivity to Cultural Differences

Standard bioethics is ripe for transformation. Richard Payne, MD, John B. Francis Chair at the Center and Esther Colliflower Professor of Medicine and Divinity at Duke Dvinity School, Duke University, provides a preview of his Flanigan Lecture, where he argues that cardinal principles of ethics (autonomy, non-malfeasance, benificense and justice) may over-emphasize autonomy to the detriment of underserved people from different cultural perspectives. (July 14, 2011)

 

Spirituality and Race in End of Life Care 

What does spirituality and race have to do with end of life care? Terry Rosell, Rosemary Flanigan Chair, and Richard Payne, MD, professor at Duke University and John B. Francis Chair at the Center, discuss disparities in healthcare in African American populations and how they impact care at the end of life prior to presenting a program on the same subject to African American faith leaders in Topeka on July 27, 2011.

 

Respecting the Disabled at the End of Life

Where do we stand when it comes to people with disabilities and end of life issues? Paul Tobin, president and CEO of the United Spinal Association, will address this question in Kansas City at the Legacy of Nancy Cruzan Conference November 12 and 13, 2010. (October 20, 2010)

 

Matching Physicians with Patients in Need

In 2005, it was an idea. Two years later, it became a reality. Now It’s the Northland Care/MetroCARE program, a specialty care network for the poor and uninsured in the Kansas City area. Jill Watson of the Metropolitan Medical Society and Dr.Tyler Brundige talk about the program. (April 24, 2009)

 

Rosemary Flanigan Lecture Presents "The Ethics of Spectacle" with Karla Holloway

In this short interview, Duke University Professor Karla Holloway, PhD, explored how medical information - typically seen as intimate and private - is forced into the public sphere. The resulting social dramas become spectacles that play out on the bodies of minorities and women. Dr. Holloway called for a "cultural bioethics" that attends to race, gender, the right to privacy and justice. The lecture was on August 13, 2014, Disparities & Vulnerable Populations, Karla Holloway, PHd.

 

Healthcare and Social Justice from the Heartland to Haiti 

Helen Emmott, a nurse ethicist, explains why healthcare and social justice challenges exist not just in Haiti but in the heartland of America as well.  (January 14, 2011)

 

The Ethics of Care for Undocumented Immigrants

Disparities & Vulnerable Populations

 

Lee Woodruff: ReMind Us about Returning Vets

Lee and Bob Woodruff are recipients of the 2012 Vision to Action Award, the highest honor conferred by the Center for Practical Bioethics. Ms. Woodruff accepted the award during the Center’s Annual Dinner on April 19, 2012. In her acceptance remarks, she talks about their work with ReMind, an organization that tends to the needs of injured military veterans returning to the US from conflicts all over the world. (April 23, 2012)

 

Chronic Pain and Health Disparities

September Williams, MD, discusses chronic pain, health disparities and why we need to do something abou it. Dr. Williams is an internal medicine physician at the San Francisco Public Health Department’s Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center. She is also a clinical ethicist and a film maker. (March 9, 2011, September Williams, MD)

The Bioethics of Gay Men Donating Blood

 

Hospice in American Prisons

 

LECTURES

Bioethics and the Underserved: Culture, Values and Justice 

There is much in contemporary health care that is ripe for transformation, including bioethics. Standard bioethics codified in the ethical principles of "autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance, and justice" needs to be challenged as too limiting a framework for analyzing and responding to ethical and moral issues raised by the problems of inadequate health care for many.

Standard bioethics codified in the ethical principles of "autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance, and justice" needs to be challenged as too limiting a framework for analyzing and responding to ethical and moral issues raised by the problems of inadequate health care for many.In this lecture, Dr. Richard Payne, M.D., discusses how medical professionals might consider a wider perspective of bioethics that encompasses cultural narratives and perspectives that should enhance richer and more robust dimensions of ethical decision making.

In this July 26, 2011, lecture, Dr. Richard Payne, M.D., discusses how medical professionals might consider a wider perspective of bioethics that encompasses cultural narratives and perspectives that should enhance richer and more robust dimensions of ethical decision making.