Tag / aging

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  • End of Life: Treatment Redirection

    What is the role of treatment direction in end-of-life care?

  • Chronic Disease and Aging

    Most Americans will die of complications from a chronic disease.

  • Long-Term Care – Institution, Residence, Hospital, or Home?

    Finding quality long-term nursing care is a growing concern for millions of Americans.

  • Educational Initiatives in Long-Term Care

    Educational Initiatives in Long-Term Care   Most Americans would doubtless agree that positive change is a critical need in facilities providing long-term care. This article describes a project in which staff from the Midwest Bioethics Center (now the Center for Practical Bioethics) and Kansas City area experts in long-term care worked to create meaningful change…

  • Caregiver Access to Resources

    Caregiver Access to Resources Helping Caregivers’ Self-Identify The reluctance of spouses and family members to identify themselves as caregivers is an obstacle to providing services to them. Caren Rugg describes an outreach program that is overcoming this barrier.

  • Honoring Caregivers – A National Initiative

    An estimated 120 million adult Americans (57 percent) are either providing unpaid care to an adult family member or friend or have provided this care in the past.

  • Booming Past 65: Aging in Kansas City

    A new study projects the number of residents 65 and older in metro Kansas City to double by the year 2030.

  • Aging in Community with Help at Home

    An estimated 120 million adult Americans (57 percent) are either providing unpaid care to an adult family member or friend or have provided this care in the past.

  • Clay County Senior Services Grant to KC4 Aging in Community

    An estimated 120 million adult Americans (57 percent) are either providing unpaid care to an adult family member or friend or have provided this care in the past.

  • Case Study – “If you prick me, do I not bleed?”

    Case Study – If you prick me, do I not bleed? Elizabeth is over 100 years old, with little cognitive decline. Her blood-thinning medication requires monthly blood draws, which are painful and distressing to Elizabeth. Is continuing the monthly blood draws the right thing to do? How can healthcare providers clearly state what they believe…